martes, mayo 06, 2014

Todas las campanas / US Preventive Service Task Force, recomendaciones para tamizaje para cáncer de mama / Nov 2009


Frigorífico Anglo, Fray Bentos, Río Negro, Uruguay
Una ruina de imperios de otro tiempo / foto del editor

El U.S. Preventive Services Task Force  (nombre difícil traducir este cargado de significaciones castrenses) en sus recomendaciones de 2009, se posiciona en contra de la realización rutinaria de mamografías como tamizaje de cáncer de mama en mujeres entre 40 y 49 años.


El editor



U.S. Preventive Services Task Force*; Screening for Breast Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2009 Nov;151(10):716-726. 

Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends against routine screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years. The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take into account patient context, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms. (Grade C recommendation)

The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74 years. (Grade B recommendation)

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of screening mammography in women 75 years or older. (I statement)

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination beyond screening mammography in women 40 years or older. (I statement)
The USPSTF recommends against clinicians teaching women how to perform breast self-examination. (Grade D recommendation)
The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer. (I statement)



The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) makes recommendations about preventive care services for patients without recognized signs or symptoms of the target condition.


It bases its recommendations on a systematic review of the evidence of the benefits and harms and an assessment of the net benefit of the service.


The USPSTF recognizes that clinical or policy decisions involve more considerations than this body of evidence alone. Clinicians and policymakers should understand the evidence but individualize decision making to the specific patient or situation.